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Us 15, America 12, Tourette 10, Brazil 9, California 9, Boehner 7, Haiti 7, Elizabeth 6, Sarah Shourd 6, Taylor 6, New York 6, San Bruno 6, Washington 5, John Boehner 5, Campbell 5, George Stephanopoulos 4, Elizabeth Vargas 4, United States 4, Susan G. Komen 4, Sam 4,
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  ABC    ABC News Good Morning America    News/Business. News and  
   entertainment. New. (CC)  

    September 13, 2010
    7:00 - 8:59am PDT  

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i'm george stephanopoulos. >> and i'm elizabeth vargas. it is monday, september 13th. this morning, release heldup. that hiker in jail still awaiting to come home. they want $500,000 in cash. we have the latest from washington and tehran. monster igor. the hurricane strengthens overnight expected to turn into a massive category 5 storm today. winds over 150 miles an hour. is the u.s. in the path? parents plea. their teenager ran off with her boyfriend who she met online. now, they can't get her back. and now the custody battle for the 15-year-old girl. and gaga's night.
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don't miss how kanye west and taylor swift finally made up. we hope you had a good weekend. robin roberts is on assignment this morning. welcome back to elizabeth vargas. >> good to be here. >> what a weekend for sarah shourd and her family. late last week the irrangian government finally decided to release. in part her health among other things a lump in her breast. they're saying if her family comes up with $500,000. >> and the nightmare not ending because shourd and the other two hikers with her may face a trial. >> they would want her to come back after paying the bill for that. also, on taxes over the weekend. the house republican leader john
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boehner own another weekend said he's considering but president obama is cutting taxes. >> what made him blink? did he in fact blink? and is this the end of the impasse? white house press secretary robert gibbs joins us. this is playing out, and first from senior correspondent jim sciutto in washington. jim? >> good mornings george. the latest stumbling block, $500,000 in cash. the iranians demanding it be paid in cash the swiss because we don't have diplomatic relations there are having trouble raising it leaving sarah shourd still awaiting behind bars. >> reporter: for sarah shourd, another agonizing day of waiting. her impending release canceled on friday and reinstated on
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saturday. the prosecutor saying because she is sick and we can help her health condition, the judge agreed to $500,000 bail. and the startling announcement that iran would still try shourd and the two other american hikers, josh fattal and shane bauer, for illegally entering the country. when released shourd will leave her boyfriend shane bauer and josh josh fattal. >> i'm sure it will weigh heavily on her. nobody wants to think that two people's lives depend on family turning to a country. >> reporter: the lawyer was finally allowed to meet with hi clients for the first time 14 months ago and found them in despite of everything, in high spirits. we were together for two to three hours, he said and i'm hoping to get all of them leased on bail. iran's financial system is under severe restrictions due to u.s.
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sanctions. so particularly hard to raise that cash. >> and christiane amanpour anchor of "this week" joins us. >> good morning, elizabeth. >> so much back and forth. she's released and then not. why the contradictory signals? >> well, the french and the american-canadian journalist arrested after the elections they were eventually released in change for money. now, shourd and her two colleagues. >> reporter: in for 14 months they still haven't charged. and it looks like all of this boils down to the internal struggle that's going on between president ahmadinejad and the other political opponents. >> president ahmadinejad in fact himself orchestrated sarah shourd's release and he was overruled by the judiciary. what was his saying about him?
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it's quite a humiliation for him. >> judiciary said not so fast we're going to do it according to our time and our rules. now, the head of the judiciary belongs to a family that's a main opponent political opponent of ahmadinejad. i think a lot of this is wrapped up in that argument and the internal struggles going on in iran. >> sarah shourd's family said she needs medical treatment for two potentially cancerous conditions. will she be allowed to leave iran if she is released? >> unclear. in change for money right after these disputed elections, the two were allowed to leave. one would think she'd be allowed to. it's frankly, extraordinary, that she's not allowed to have medical treatment if she's not ill. >> what does this say about the two other imprisoned they may face a trial, one of them she's engaged to be married to.
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she may feel a lot of pressure to return to iran because of the connections to the two men? >> again, that's probably true. again, we don't know if they've been charged. a lot of this is also about the desperate stage of relations between the united states and iran. >> and you're telling me that she just saw their lawyer for the first time in quite a long time? >> yeah, since he was hired back in 2009 for the first time this weekend. >> all right, christiane amanpour, thank you. in his press conference on friday, president obama criticized republicans or cutting taxes for the middle class. house republican leader john boehner signaled he might accept president obama's plan to end president bush's tax cuts for everyone making over $250,000 but extend them for everyone else. >> the only option i have to
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vote for-those tax reductions, i'll vote for them. >> our senior white house correspondent jake tapper is in washington. jake, white house aides pounced on this saying essentially boehner blinked? >> that's right. there would be no tax cuts for anyone unless they also went to the top income earners but that was untenable. boehner's office has a different take. one, they don't know if nancy pelosi, the speaker of the house is going to allow a vote on the upper end cut so the position was almost irrelevant. two, they think that the real tension is here between democrats and democrats in the senate. there are four democrats who want tax cuts for everyone including the wealthy. >> and also colorado senator michael donet may be for the
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compromise. which is why republicans are pushing for are the senate to go first. they think this might not even get to boehner? >> that's exactly right. the senate is expected to take this up in the next couple of weeks, i'm telling you, this announcement by boehner has really thrown a monkey wrench into the works. it's not clear what they're going to introduce now because they're not sure what strategy they should have considering the strategy that boehner has now taken. >> and a good chance this whole thing could be thrown over until after the election. thanks very much. let's go to the white house with white house secretary robert gibbs. good morning, robert. >> good morning. >> you were tweeting furiously on "face the nation" yesterday. as jake and i were discussing your problems with your own senate democrats, at least four maybe five senate democrats saying they want some sort of compromise. >> well, let's deal with what
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john boehner said initially. the president believed that and we certainly hope what john boehner says is a willingness to accept that as a big win for middle class families. look george, we'll have all sorts of debates inside our party. we've done that for decades now. i think the president's position is clear. let's extend the tax breaks and tax cuts for the middle dallas. let's provide them with help in economic times of uncertainty. but let's not borrow $700 billion for tax cuts for millionaires. >> you said don't borrow the $700 billion for tax cuts. is the president committed to using that $700 billion to not to spend on other programs? >> the president has not outlined spending it on other programs. the president doesn't believe we can afford to borrow what from overseas to pay for that quite frankly, what we don't need.
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>> the president also hasn't said how he plans for the $3 trillion in tax cuts. how will he pay for it? >> well look george we understand in times of uncertainty, we can't raise taxes on the middle class. we're going to follow through with that. we believe that's a promise at that president made in the campaign. we think on top of that though there's no need to borrow an extra $700 billion to give tax cuts to those who make more than $1 million a year. >> but you are saying that the president is not going to outline ways to pay for the extension of the $3 trillion? >> the extension of the middle class tax cuts the president has drawn a line though in bauer rogue that extra $700 billion for the wealthy. >> do you think this battle is over now? are you certain that the president's going to be able to block an extension of the bush tax cuts for people making more than $250,000 a year? >> well george i think we're going to have to see what
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congressman boehner does and says today. we're going to have to see what senator mcconnell over in the senate does and says today. i think congressman boehner was fairly clear in outlining that position that the president outlined last week. let's provide some certainty. let's cut taxes for middle class families in this country. let's not use them as a political football or hold them hostage, whatever you want to say. let's go ahead and provided much needed tax relief for middle class americans who have been struggling not just in this recession but years before that. >> from newt gingrich he described what he sees as the president's misguided policies. what is it president obama is so outside of our comprehension that only if you understand kenyan, anti-colonial behavior can you begin to piece together his actions. and he goes on to say, that is the most accurate predictive model for his behavior." your response? >> george i think you may have hit the nail on the head that it
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is hard to comprehend. i don't even have quite frankly, george the slightest idea what he's talking about. >> no idea what he's talking about? >> you know i think newt gingrich knows that he's trying to appeal to the fringe of people that don't believe the president was born in this country. you would normally expect better from somebody who has held the position of speaker of the house. most people will say anything. newt gingrich says that on us generally on a regular basis. >> okay robert gibbs. thanks for your time this morning. now, juju chang has the rest of the morning headlines. >> hey, george, good morning, elizabeth and everybody. federal investigators are set to reconstruct a natural gas pipeline that exploded in san bruno, california, they knew three years ago at that gas line was at risk for failure. crews in colorado are battling another wildfire, the
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second in a week. at least one home was destroyed near loveland. meanwhile, officials say the fire near boulder that burned 170 homes may have been sparked by a resident's fire pit. and bankers from around the world have agreed to a new rule. three times as much capital in reserve it could be more than a decade before mandatory. and lightning fast from the gridiron. not the players, the stadium today. the new billion-dollar stadium is put to the test. it will be transformed from the new york giants who played sunday to the new york jets who play tonight. the lights will be changed even the jerseys in the fan shops will be switched. all in 24 hours. of course, "monday night football" kicked off. coverage begins at 7:00. >> a busy day. >> lots of overtime for the
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workers. >> let's go to sam champion for the weather. good morning. we're going to start with hurricane central. we've got three storms hitting the atlantic. igor is the biggest storm. could get to rare category 5 today. we've not seen one since 2007. the storms to watch, this one in the caribbean, and will we see it in the western gulf by the time we get to the weekend. igor looks like it's going to curve off to the atlantic. the thunderstorms pop up in sioux falls to kansas city today. also in the stationary front area, in northern new england, in the afternoon, thunderstorms will start to roll. big board, fairly quiet, atlanta, 86, phoenix, 103.
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n@ >> all of america's weather in the next half hour elizabeth? >> thanks so much, sam. now, finally some good news
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for the 33 miners trapped more than 2,000 feet underground in chile. as they wait to be rescued, they now have creature comforts from home to help them pass the time. wow believe they're actually watching television. jeffrey kofman is at the scene in chile with the very latest. good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning to you, elizabeth. that's right, they now have electricity, running water and fresh air. the fresh air critical because their desperate for cigarettes. they're now allowed two packs of cigarettes a day. rescue could be weeks or months away. each day breaks another record for the trapped miners. and each day rescue teams break new frontiers to keep the men alive, half a mile underground. ♪ live tv for their beloved soccer games. they're fighting like the soccer
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players, he said we're fighting to get out of this hole. there is a tiny hole that connects them to the surface. everything must be four inches or smaller to fit into the supply tube. through a second hole they now have electricity, video link running water and fresh air to now talk to and see their families live. everything is fine she says just be calm down there, dad." the chilean government is amassing huge resources to liberate the men. over the weekend, 42 trucks brought in a giant oil rig to be assembled over the next week. they expect at least one of the three drill rigs will reach the miners by november. then they'll squeeze into a 26-inch wide cage for a three-hour ride to freedom. getting all the men out will take four days. families wait patiently. she clutches a letter from her brother. "i haven't been very
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affectionate in the past he write, but i want you to know you're a good sister thank you for standing by me." elizabeth can't make it to the mine to get close to her trapped husband. nine months' pregnant her first daughter was to be delivered tomorrow. she was going to be called hope. we'll send it down so he can watch it on the little tv down there. how did they get a tv that small down there. we got ours on amazon for $300. this is how that trapped miner will watch the birth of his daughter. elizabeth. >> esperanza. thank you so much jeffrey kofman. we marvel it. >> i can't believe how healthy they look. okay. now to the vmas, it seems like
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something shocking always happens. this year was no exception. there was a face-off between taylor swift and kanye west. a cameo from lindsay lohan and what a night for lady gaga. chris connelly was out there. >> hey good morning. last year vmas saw kanye west interrupt taylor swift's speech. taylor swift and kanye west provided the preshow buzz. but the real sound of the mtv vmas was a gargantuan scream. prior to her parade of way over the edge wear lady gaga entered with service people with the don't ask don't tell policy. >> their stories are very inspiring. not one person is more valuable than another person. >> reporter: she left with eight
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statues. >> because we were born this way, baby! >> reporter: including video of the veer from a riotously retro cler cher rocking "if i could turn back time." >> i'm the oldest with the biggest hair and littlest costume. >> reporter: unlikely authority. >> wake up handler. don't you get it you're next. >> reporter: jersey shore's snooki and the situation. usher put on a show. and 16-year-old justin bieber busted out new and improved dance skills before scoring the best new artist. >> thank you to everybody. >> reporter: taylor and kanye did not appear together but indirectly addressed their drama in music. the 20-year-old singer/songwriter extending an
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angelic hand of forgiveness in the song "innocent." meanwhile, the ever embattled but constantly compelling kanye came on differently. taking himself to test. ♪ >> reporter: still it was lady's night, a pop empress ready to raise the roof. ♪ god makes no mistake i'm on the right track baby i was born this way ♪ >> taylor and kanye, two people with major drama and no contact who didn't attack each other on tv. they'd never make it on reality tv. >> sure wouldn't. thanks so much, chris. coming up the runaway teenager now at the center of an
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international custody battle. >> the 15-year-old rang off to brazil. why can't her parents get her back? as a va doctor, i have more time to spend with my patients. and that's the kind of attention our veterans deserve. ♪ (announcer) learn more about careers with today's va at vacareers.va.gov.
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♪ ♪ there's more than one way to be heard. say it like you mean it. outspoken by fergie. exclusively for avon. call your avon representative now. ies put me in a fog. now i'm claritin clear. claritin works hard to relieve my worst symptoms without drowsiness... ...so i stay as alert and focused as someone without allergies. for me, claritin is the perfect allergy medicine. i only live claritin clear rise and shine! [ man ] ♪ today the world looks mighty fine ♪ [ women ] ♪ pop-tarts happy sunshine time! ♪ [ man ] ♪ grab a pop-tart and you might just start ♪ ♪ to sing songs like a meadow lark ♪ ♪ stretch and
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yawn ♪ ♪ blow a kiss to mom ♪ ♪ cause pop-tarts mornings are the bomb ♪ ♪ so, rise and shiiiiine ♪ here are the latest developments on the san bruno fire. the casualty count stands at four confirmed dead and four others still missing. two residents thought to be missing were located and safe yesterday. federal investigators are taking the ruptured section of pipe to
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washington d.c. for analysis. the state public utilities commission has ordered pg&e to immediately step up inspections of its gas pipeline system statewide. this morning the owners of 48 homes destroyed or severely damaged in the explosion and fire will find out when they might be allowed back in to try to collected belongings and what disaster systems are available. the monday morning commute. >> hot spots for you. a new injury crash reported in palo alto south 101 at university blocking a lane. traffic moving at 24 mph. south 880 heavy out of san leandro approaching 92 because of an earlier injury crash and southbound 101 at the tunnel. an earlier injury accident cleared but traffic jammed from highway 1. check out the bay bridge toll plaza backed up past
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look at you. body rested. stress gone. mind sharp. because unisom gave you deep restful sleep all night. morning early birds. unisom. good night. good morning. >> temperatures 50:just about everywhere. a presented to 62 at san
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francisco. 67 oakland. 75 san jose. santa rosa 74. upper 80
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so have you paid too much at the supermarket? scanner mistakes can cost you a bundle and they happen a lot more often than you might think. elisabeth leamy goes undercover to show you how to protect yourself. good morning america, i'm george stephanopoulos. >> and i'm elizabeth vargas. robin roberts is on assignment. those scanners go by so fast sometimes. also, we're going to have a sneak peek at oprah's final season. after 25 years, has she saved her biggest and best until last? and what will her departure mean for her fans in the future in daytime television? >> oprah says she wants to be present and in the moment for all of them.
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>> you've got the inside scoop, right? >> yeah. >> exactly. first, we're going to begin this morning with two parents trying desperately to bring their 15-year-old daughter back from brazil. the teenager ran away with a boyfriend who she met online a year ago. first, sharon alpsyn alfonsi has more on the story. >> reporter: samantha hernandez said she's not coming back to the u.s. the 15-year-old spoke to us last night. >> i plan to stay here for the rest of my life. i'm not going back. if i do i'm going back in a body bag. i'm not leaving here. >> reporter: the drama started about a year ago, hernandez met her 17-year-old boyfriend known as junior online. right away her mother wasn't impressed. >> they didn't go to the same school. he drove a black camaro and did have a driver's license.
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i don't think there was very much that we did like. >> reporter: somehow the teen and her boyfriend got plane tickets. she was traveling with a falsified passport. they took hernandez into custody but then released her into temporary cust today's of her boyfriend's family. her family says they cannot get her back. >> if this was a senator's daughter or a congressman's daughter, somebody would have gotten her back already. >> when the authorities released her into the custody of this family, rather than putting her on a plane and sending her back to the u.s. >> reporter: still junior's relatives who samantha is staying with say they can't understand why her parents haven't flown to brazil to talk to her in person. >> if they're so loving and caring why they're not here? i don't understand.
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i cannot have this girl with me forever. >> reporter: the state department and fbi are now involved trying to determine if and how they might be able to get samantha home. for "good morning america," sharyn alfonsi, abc news new york. >> samantha hernandez's mother joins us here from massachusetts. thanks for being here. you spoke to your daughter this past weekend. what did she say to you? >> she had a lot of noise in the backgrounds. she said she had gotten a cell phone but i couldn't get the number from her correctly. i told her if i can't call her back, for her to try and call me back. >> did she tell you why she did this? >> she's given a lot of different reasons. you mean about why she's gone? >> in brazil. >> right. she's given a lot of different reasons. you know, her runaway note was
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reason. then the reasons have been evolving over time over the last two weeks. >> where was that runaway note found? and what did it say? >> it was found in her drawer the next morning when i noticed that her things were gone also. and it basically said momma's going to die and then i'm going to get sent to florida. and then die is going to die and then i'm going to skip out now. >> that must have been incredibly disturbing to read this note and to find out she had actually gotten on this airplane and flown all the way to south america? >> you have no idea. it's like losing a child. i mean there's an empty space here. and inside of me. and it really is like losing a child. i mean i know that she's alive. but she's 15 and i don't have the daily interactivity with
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her. she needs to be in school. >> where did she get this fake passport and the money to get to brazil? >> i would like to me myself. i would like to know who has access to these types of things and fake passports. and air flight to brazil is $1,200 to $1,500. she's 15 years old. i would really like to know who paid for that. >> she told us on the telephone last night that the only way she would return from brazil is quote in a body bag." that must be very difficult to hear? >> i think it was easier to hear that she'd rather be thrown in a tank with sharks and meat tied around her neck than to hear that. that really got me. >> are you going to go down to brazil yourself to try to bring your daughter back? >> i definitely would love to just go there and be with her and definitely bring her back if she's not willing, then i
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would literally be kidnapping my daughter from the country. >> kidnapping your daughter even though she's an american citizen and a minor and your daughter? >> that's contactexactly what i say about this case. she has been kidnapped. you give any child who is unable to make responsible decisions for themselves because of that age. any type of lollipop or puppy, they're going to go unwillingly. that's pretty much what happened. >> joy, that's playing out in the united states and brazil. both countries looking at the case. thank you so much for being with us this morning. time for the weather and sam champion. good morning, sam. >> good morning, elizabeth. we're going to look at the 3-d interpretation of the latest saddlitis data coming off of igor. look at this storm. this is really an incredible storm. it's huge, it's powerful. could get to that category 5 level today.
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haven't had a category 5 since 2007. here's what spears it. there's an area of high pressure in the atlantic that igor will kind of wrap around. again, another cold front. does this look familiar? it's a pattern with just about every storm. this storm is held well offshore. it will weaken when it gets to the atlantic. but it's still a problem for bermuda. expect it in that direction. we'll watch it every day. hour by hour. here's an idea of the cooler temperatures, look at the mid-atlantic states all the way back to the great lakes. portland at 62 new york 65. washington, d.c., 83 degrees. right in this region is where a front settles here. it's likely even though the skies clear out will build thunderstorms in upper state new york and massachusetts. a little bit of new england. ed thunderstorms will kick up there. there's also one or
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>> all that weather was brought to you by campbell's soup. elizabeth. >> sam, thanks so much. coming up next an undercover investigation. supermarket mistakes that can cost you big time. running there? dancing there? flying there? how about eating soup to get there? delicious campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, energy farm-grown ingredients and can help you keep a healthy weight. helping you get to a happier place. have a nice trip. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do.
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i had a bum knee that needed surgery. but it got complicated because i had an old injury. so i wanted a doctor who had done this before. and unitedhealthcare's database helped me find a surgeon. you know you can't have great legs, if you don't have good knees. we're 78,000 people looking out for 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. i don't play around with my health. i heard that nearly 4 out 5 women aren't getting enough vitamin d. so i take one a day women's, a complete multivitamin with more vitamin d to support bone and breast health. [ female announcer ] one a day women's.
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each year, shoppers lose as much as $2.5 billion because of scanner errorairerrors. this morning's "america's consumer" we take a look at mistakes. >> hey, george supermarket errors sometimes work out in the customer's favor but that doesn't help you if you're the one who got overcharged. it's especially common around
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high-volume times like around the holidays but it can happen any day. >> reporter: we're tagging along under cover with inspectors from new york city's department of consumer affairs. first, they chose random groceries. the most common problems are scales that charge for the plastic package when they're supposed to charge for the food. and stores that charge tax on nontaxable items. >> it shouldn't be a consumer's job to have to bird dog checkout. >> reporter: recently conducting a sweep of more than 1,000 supermarkets, more than half failed in sections. >> i think the real question is not are they trying to purposely cheat customers, but are they really making the effort to make sure that their customers are charged appropriately. >> reporter: on this day, at this store, new york inspectors
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found 16 violations. like a bottle government charged when it's not required. and no price per pound listed on del deli salads. and take a look at this package of salami, sticker price, 3.09. register price, $3.49. a 40 cent overcharge. >> it really adds up for people watching their budget. >> reporter: it's not just new york. north carolina state testing found 5% of products rang up wrong. in wisconsin, 4% were high. in california about 3%. vermont cited a quarter of its stores for scanner violations. and arizona inspectors found 91 scanner overcharges this year with a total of more than $100. in california authorities took the unusual step of filing 62 criminal charges against ralphs grocery chains. one allegation that stores
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charge for ice coating seafood. >> $9.99 a pound scrimp is sold with ice. customers are paying for water. >> reporter: ralphs said it took care of a jot of the violations when issued and that it continues to work to resolve the charges. is it worth searching out overcharges of a few contributes. cents? lana spent more than a decade looking at it. >> highest amount i ever brought home in a shopping trip was over $1,000. >> reporter: eventually, she was banned from two new england supermarket chains. she said she was taking advantage but she says stores are. >> even if it's 2% of the total purchase when you think of how much money americans spend on items, that's a lot of money. >> these food marketing
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institute which represent grocery chains told that you say stores strive for 100% accuracy even though a typical store stocks 35,000 different products. and in a recent study, grocery stores had the highest accuracy rate of any industry. still it pays to pay attention. so what do you do? either write down or take a cell phone picture of those shelf tags so you can compare. if you don't want to do every single item, what you can do is spot check your item. review the receipt before you leave the store so you're not tempted to skip getting that few cents' refund later and find out where the free offers are. george. >> also, if you want to complain about overcharging at any kind of store, you can contact your state's state by state list. still ahead, the secret to america's favorite restaurants.
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depression is a serious medical condition that can take so much out of you. i feel like i have to wind myself up just to get out of bed. then...well, i have to keep winding myself up to deal with the sadness the loss of interest the trouble concentrating, the lack of energy. [ male announcer ] if depression is taking so much out of you ask your doctor about pristiq®. pristiq is a prescription medicine proven to treat depression. pristiq is thought to work by affecting the levels of two chemicals in the brain, serotonin and norepinephrine. tell your doctor right away if your depression worsens or you have unusual changes in mood, behavior, or thoughts of suicide. antidepressants can increase suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children teens and young adults. pristiq is not approved for children under 18. do not take pristiq with maois. taking pristiq with nsaid pain relievers aspirin, or blood
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thinners may increase bleeding risk. tell your doctor about all your medications including those for migraine to avoid a potentially life-threatening condition. pristiq may cause or worsen high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or glaucoma. tell your doctor if you have heart disease or before you reduce or stop taking pristiq. side effects may include nausea, dizziness and sweating. for me, pristiq is a key in helping to treat my depression. ask your doctor about pristiq.
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we have a remarkable story of courage to tell you about this morning. back in october of 2007 staff sergeant salvatore gionta's unit was ambushed by the taliban in afghanistan. after being shot by the body armor he wore himself. a soldier was wounded and being
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dragged away. for that effort he's the first living recipient of the military's highest award. he spoke to martha raddatz at the military base in vincenza, italy. >> how often do you think of that? >> every day. to tell a story about that day hurts me. it hurts to go into it. i can tell you there was american soldiers from all around the united states of america fighting for the united states closing and destroying any enemy with immense bravery. every single one of them have gone above and beyond anything that should ever been asked of them. they'll continue to do it. they're doing it today. they'll do it tomorrow. they'll do it again. >> so you're really fighting
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there because of the guy next to you? >> that's your buddy. your brother in arms. that's who you're there with. that's who's fighting there with you and for you. >> tell me about the phone call from the president. >> i knew it was coming. when you hear him, he's not addressing the nation he's not addressing the world. he was talking to me. my heart was racing. i was squeezing her i was squeezing my wife's hand jen was right there with me. she knew who it was. but there were people in the office at the time. mr. president, and my heart stopped. it was intense. >> he's talking about his heroism, very matter of fact but that call. only 25 years of old. >> that was list second deployment to afghanistan. men and women, there have been seven other medal of honor
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winners but others have died. >> he had received the purple heart. he was wounded in battle. >> you can see more of sergeant giunta's story on "nightline." coming up next a look at oprah's final season. >> this is it. this is it. quilted is towel speak for air. but viva puts 35% more towel between you
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always a lot going on. we have three children and two dogs. this is my baby. this is the most expensive member of the household. scotty needed a new laptop for college, but we don't like to pay interest unnecessarily. so, the blueprint plan couldn't have come at a better time because i'm able to designate what i pay off every month and then what i'm going to pay off over time. blueprint really gives me peace of mind. with blueprint on her slate card, geraldine designed a plan to save money on interest. does your credit card have blueprint? they can make all the difference for the child who finally solved that math problem... for the student who always dreamed about college... or the debate club that won state. they are teachers and school professionals providing our children the individual attention that means results... working with parents as partners to improve learning... building stronger public schools for all of us. the california teachers association-- giving every child the opportunity to succeed.
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>> investigators still don't know what caused a gas line to explode and burn through a san bruno neighborhood. pg&e said it's checking one witness account for a worker checking for gas leaks in the area that burned two days later after the checking was done. the company said it received no reports of gas leaks in that area during the week leading up to the thursday's deadly explosion and fire. mike has a look at the forecast. >> it's going to be a sunny look this afternoon. good morning. clouds should be back all the way to the coast by 2:00, out of our valleys by noon. mid to upper 60s around the bay, low to mid-70s south bay, north
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bay and mid to upper 70s in the east bay. looks like it will get warmer through thursday. frances. >> mike live shot bay bridge toll plaza. backed up to the maze. a 45 minute drive. bart ten minute delays due to an earlier equipment problem on the
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don't mess around with pain. ♪ ♪ just another manic monday ♪ a manic monday in our house. first day of school. >> i know. are they nervous? >> very nervous last night. but they had their outfits all spread out before they went to bed. >> see, you have such girls. my boys are like, i have to go to school? >> hi, i'm george stephanopoulos. elizabeth vargas is here because robin roberts is on assignment. and ahead this morning. we go inside a baffling disorder. this affects thousands and thousands of kids across the country. it's called tourette's syndrome. could a promising new surgery actually be the cure in how it affects the kids. we'll show you how it's going to help this little boy live a full
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life. >> especially for kids they have no idea what's going on. also ahead, what's your favorite restaurant? every week more than 4 million americans eat at the olive garden. >> pasta. >> that's right. we reveal the secrets of the biggest italian food chain in the world and kick off our special series on america's favorite restaurants. later, tory johnson is here with five success stories of people making thousands of dollars a month selling person to person. even door to door. she tells us how you can get in on the action. the avon lady is back. >> they are coming back and doing well in this tough economy. first, the beginning of an era. after 25 years, oprah is kicking off her final season of "the oprah winfrey show" later today. and even the queen of talk has everyone talking about what viewers can expect. andrea canning is here with a preview. i can't believe we're starting the end today. >> i know. and george just told me everyone is getting $1 million and a house. it's so exciting. he does have the inside scoop.
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>> i know. >> totally kidding. it is a mystery to everyone. but oprah and her team they promise to knock your socks off this afternoon, and that is a quote. this season is a big endeavor. going through 5,000 hours of footage and have 70,000 people to comb through who have impacted their lives in a major way. >> reporter: it's at supersize, top-secret season premiere. >> oh, thank you! >> reporter: with big celebrities like john travolta. >> you still make my heart pitter patter. >> reporter: and even bigger giveaways. >> this is really my last chance to something really big. >> reporter: the queen of talk tells "tv guide" after 25 years "i don't intend to be crying the whole season. the only time i get really emotional and nostalgic about the show is when i think about the viewers." those viewers have helped her fake "forbes" most powerful celebrity for the fourth time. the media mogul is worth an
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estimated $2.4 billion. books and products with her blessing fly off the shelves. and she's launched countless careers. oprah's departure will create a seismic shift in daytime television leaving a giant hole in the schedules around the country. >> she provides an incredible lead-in for local newscast. there's going to be a real kind of land grab for the real estate that she occupies. >> reporter: but on january 1st, the legend will continue with o.w.n. the oprah winfrey network, expected to reach 70 million homes. >> it's a huge deal for oprah to go from her own incredibly successful show to having a whole network that she's putting her name on. so she's really kind of taking a big scandal with it. >> and the show will actually continue until may. and oprah said it's her intention to be fully present. guys, she's actually trying to locate all the original audience members from her very first episode. but she's having a hard time
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because they didn't keep records back then. >> wow. >> a lot of people are calling, i was there. >> i was there, too. can i go? >> exactly. all right. time to go to juju for a check of the morning's news headlines. good morning, andrea and elizabeth and george. it's a waiting game for the american woman who has been held in iran for more than a year. sarah shourd has been cleared for release but first her family has to pay $500,000 in bail. she's being released for medical treatment but could still face trial on spying charges along with her two fellow hikes are being detained. lawmakers in washington could battle it out over tax cuts. house republican john boehner now says if given an option, he would vote for the president's plan to extend tax cuts for the middle class only but republicans also want tax cuts for the wealthy to help create jobs. the president wants to let the cuts expire to reduce the deficit.
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well regulators have ordered pacific gas & electric to inspect the entire area for the massive explosion in san bruno. federal investigators are plan to investigate the blast virtually wiping out the entire neighborhoods. in connecticut, the murder trial begins for one of the men charged in a cold-blooded home invasion that sent shock waves through the state. he'll come face-to-face with lone survivor who lost his entire family in the grisly attack. more from ashleigh banfield. >> reporter: it's been three years since the horrifying crime. july 2007, in the dark of night, two men broke into the home of william petit, a connecticut doctor. they beat dr. petit near to death. held his family hostage for hours. they robbed and sexually assaulted his wife jennifer and youngest daughter mikaela. they set fire to the house, killing everyone inside but
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dr. petit who was able to crawl to safety. steven hayes and 30-year-old joshua komisarjevsky were caught within minutes just blocks away driving petit's car. they both face the death penalty in a crime considered one of connecticut's worst. >> this was such a dastardly thing, i think the death penalty is in order. >> reporter: hayes, a former drug addict with a long criminal record will stand trial first. a trial delayed by a suicide attempt, complaints about his living conditions and arguments over the death penalty. >> the defendant gets up and talks about decency when they're defending two people who stranged a woman with multiple sclerosis and tied an 11-year-old and 17-year-old to
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their bed while burning the house. trying to dot right thing and testify to what i know and be in the face of my family because they can't be here to represent themselves. >> reporter: for "good morning america," ashleigh banfield, abc news. cheshire, connecticut. >> we all hope justice will be served. time now for the weather with sam champion. sam, fall's in the air. good morning to you. >> good morning, juju. definitely is outside. yeah, this has never happened before. i may never -- i mean, i feel like i'm actually in your house with you this morning and you're getting ready watching us. >> you're actually at the spa. >> you guys are all part of spa week. >> today kicks off national spa week which means luxury spa treatments all across the country at spaweek.com. >> can i get a little treatment, maybe a rub on the shoulder. i mean, come on. we're all keeping our robes on. let's get to the board. one or two things going on we
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want to talk about. in boston, by the way, look at this, a little cloudy sky here. boston on the edge of this front will stay cloudy and cool. you're really good at this. this spa weak week thing i like it. here's a look at temperatures as that front moves through. there will be strong storms once that pops up. elsewhere around the nation, it's fairly nice and dry. on the west coast, it's hot in the southwest.od >> something else that rarely happens, ruth and milt, 60
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year anniversary. congratulations to you both. >> thank you. >> lovely to have you. george. >>s. congratulations. we're turning now to tourette's syndrome, it's the disease that prevents people from controlling what they say. it's hard enough to adults to handle but it's devastating to children who are both embarrassed and mystified as to what's happening. now there's a new surgery that could give the 150,000 american kids who suffer from tourette's new hope. discovery health tells the story of one of them in a special tourette's uncovered. >> a lot of people look at me different. i just wish people wouldn't look at me. not look at me. >> the first time we saw tourette's show up was actually second grade. we thought he was just goofing around or joking around. >> my parents are just kind of saying well, don't do that. knock it off. and i was saying to them, i can't. i can't. >> a tic is a repetitive
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movement. it may wax and wane in severity and in frequency. it may change in location. >> tourette's is difficult because i'm on the ground rolling around or rolling around in the classroom. i can't write. i can't think. >> it can be distracting a lot of times because when we're trying to work on our homework, it's kind of easy to start watching him. >> cognitively he's completely with the program. he can vocalize what he wants, what he needs. whether his tourette's is going to allow him to concentrate. >> jonah's tic that he has right now is one where he takes off and runs. when he runs, he doesn't stop. >> i don't know what's going on in his head. one night he -- when i put him to bed, he had said that he wished that god would just let him sleep and not wake up. so that's hard to hear from your
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10-year-old. >> we tried most of the drugs out there available for tourette's. >> the side effects are unbelievable. suicidal thoughts. depression. blurry vision. but doctors said if you're not going to drug him then he strongly suggested we go with the deep brain stimulation surgery. >> we feel we have to have the surgery done just to at least give him a shot at a more normal life. >> today is jonah's surgery. >> yes, a little overwhelming, considering how long we've been waiting for it. >> we've never considered dds for a patient who did not have tourette's severe enough that it really interfered with their quality of life. >> we're going to interrupt the abnormal signal that's interfering and causing the tics in jonah.
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>> this is the best point that we want to go down. >> the degree of improvement varies, but there are a few patients who have almost no response to it. >> even after the surgery, i still have tics but they're not as bad and as frequent. >> he's twitchy, a little bit. but they're nothing compared to what they were. he's fully functioning and can do pretty much everything that other kids can do. >> look at that smile. there are other stories on tourette's on discovery health tonight. as part of adventures in parenting week. for more on this now, we're joined by dr. richard besser. hey, rich, you know, a lot of these kids in the special were misdiagnosed at first. >> right. what should parents look for? what are the signs it's tourette's? >> it can be difficult early on. early on, some of the first signs can be a mild facial tic. a little movement. the diagnosis for tourette's, you have to have both vocal and movement tics, but they don't all come together.
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it has to start before age 21. the tics change over time. so jonah who you just saw had very complex tics, but he may have started with just a little movement in his face. the tics can't be explained by another medical condition and you have to have them for a full year before you make that diagnosis. >> so it has to be very constant. you're just saying that jonah was a very extreme case. which required the extreme treatment. the deep brain stimulation. what are the lesser cases? >> mild cases have been managed with support of environment. learning the tics or the premonition that's coming on. what you can do is switch the tic that you have for something that's less disruptive. medications can be effective. a lot people have benefited from reduction in the tics from medication. then for children who are extremely severe like jonah, this type of deep brain stimulation is experimental. but for some children, it can be very beneficial. >> how do they deal with the stigma?
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>> well stigma is absolutely key. you know, the symptoms get worse in adolescent and preadd less extent years. kids really want to fitted in. you have to work with the families and friends so they understand this and provide the supportive environment. very hard. >> okay, rich besser. thanks very much. and when we come back, the secrets of your favorites restaurants. we go behind the scenes of the world's biggest italian restaurant. the olive garden. we go behind the scenes of the world's biggest italian restaurant. the olive garden. ♪ ♪ or sprinkled with italian herbs. ♪ ♪ townhouse flatbread crisps. they're perfect for snack time, party time, any time. ♪ ♪ new townhouse flatbread crisps. the everyday cracker with the specially-crafted taste.
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hd 3 [ woman ] i don't want to feel depressed. [ woman #2 ] i'd like to enjoy things again. [ woman #3 ] i feel these aches and pains.
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[ wo hd net 11 b [ man #2 ] i need to focus. [ female announcer ] depression hurts. cymbalta can help with many symptoms of depression. tell your doctor right away if your depression worsens you have unusual changes in behavior or thoughts of suicide. antidepressants can increase these in children, teens and young adults. cymbalta is not approved for children under 18. people taking maois or thioridazine or with uncontrolled glaucoma should not take cymbalta. taking it with nsaid pain relievers aspirin, or blood thinners may increase bleeding risk. severe liver problems, some fatal, were reported. signs include abdominal pain and yellowing of the skin or eyes. talk with your doctor about your medicines, including those for migraine, or if you have high fever confusion and stiff muscles to address a possible life-threatening condition. tell your doctor about alcohol use, liver disease, and before you reduce or stop taking cymbalta. dizziness or fainting may occur upon standing. side effects include nausea dry mouth, and constipation. talk to your doctor and go to cymbalta.com
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to learn about an offer to help you get started. depression hurts. cymbalta can help. americans love eating out, in fact, two-thirds of us eat out at least once a week. with all of those eager eaters facing a seemingly infinite number of choices, how do restaurants lure consumers in? this week we're going to explore the secrets of america's favorite restaurants, starting with america's largest italian restaurant chain. bianna golodryga traveled across the country to learn the secrets. >> who doesn't love italian food, right? >> i love it. >> i remember when my family first moved to the u.s. from russia, going to the olive garden was a special occasion for us. apparently, it's the same for the 250 million americans who dine there each year. i was behind the scenes to find out the recipe to their success. ♪ hey mambo italiano ♪
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>> reporter: when it comes to the foods most often found on the tip of our fork 97% of americans will tell you they love to manga italiano. >> i love pasta. >> just like the italian food, it's really good. >> that's nice. >> welcome to olive garden. >> reporter: for almost 30 years, olive garden have been serving up the italian essentials, growing into the world's largest and most successful italian restaurant chain. why do you think americans have such a love affair with italian food? >> they grew up with it. it's very familiar. i would say italian food from that perspective is soul food. >> reporter: every week more than 4 million americans, mostly women in their 40s and 50s, seek out that soul food at more than one of the 721 olive garden restaurants around the country. with an average check of $14.95 a person, that contributes to olive garden's $3.3 billion in annual sales. what's their secret for keeping
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the diners coming in? for one, those bread sticks. hot, buttery, and best of all, unlimited. last year alone, olive garden served up more than 600 million of them enough for every person in the country plus seconds. >> we serve almost 9 million bread sticks a day at olive garden. the key is, they've got to be made perfectly. >> reporter: the simple secret to that they're never frozen. delivered express to every restaurant and baked in hundreds of batches each day. >> never ending pasta bowl is back. >> reporter: then there's the pasta. olive garden was the first full-service italian restaurant to offer unlimited portions. how can that be profitable? while some diners do belly up to bowl after bowl, the average customer only eats about 1 1/2 bowls of pasta. as popular as the food is, there is common criticism that it's not real italian food. >> we're really focused on being genuine, not necessarily authentic. we're not sure authentic would translate as well.
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>> reporter: olive garden does have a culinary institute in tuscany. where chefs learn how to make classic italian dishes. before they can make it to the menu, they have to be adapted for the american palate. >> ciao. >> reporter: the chef let us into the olive garden test kitchen to share some of the secrets of americanizing italian fare. >> in italy, you have four or five main courses. in one meal. >> reporter: time? >> time, everything is done in one set. >> reporter: one secret, cut down on the meal time. instead of separate courses for pasta, meat and vegetables, incorporate them into one dish. secret number two, increase the cooking time. americans generally don't like the firmer al dente texture. of italian pasta. so at olive garden they cook it exactly one minute longer. secret number three, add cheese and lots of it. because the top-selling dishes are the ones full of cheese.
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like like lasagna. traditional guidelines are changing. olive garden is now offering lighter fare like their seafood brodetto. ♪ >> manga! manga! >> mm. that was good. that seafood was only 480 calories. you look at most popular items, lasagna, 820 calories. the creamy fettuccine alfredo -- >> don't do this to me. >> 1,222 calories. >> you look great in the kitchen, bianna. >> thanks very much. >> you can get one of their recipes at our website, abcnews.com/recipes. tomorrow, we go behind the
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doors of dairy queen. and coming up next, tory johnson is next. and now the "gma" list of the day, so what's everyone reading, here's the top five best sellers for the amazon kindle right now. number one, "the girl with the dragon tattoo." number two, "the girl who played with fire." number three, "the girl who kicked the hornet's nest." number four, "freedom." number five "a scattered life." go to abcnews.com/"gma" to get the "gma" list of ten free books you can get on the kindle right now. books you can get on the kindle right now.
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>> the latest developments from the san bruno gasoline gas explosion and fire i should say that erupted last thursday. four confirmed dead and four others missing. two residents thought missing were located safe yesterday. investigators are taking ruptured sections of pipe to washington d.c. where it will be analyzed. the state public utilities commission ordered pg&e to step up inspections statewide. the owners of 48 homes destroyed will find out when they will allowed to go in and collect belongings and what disaster assistance is available. the commute this morning. >> actually improving at the bay bridge toll plaza.
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backed up to west grand. on the peninsula southbound 101 at university a second injury accident in the same spot so traffic all the way out of san mateo and these are the slowest drive times at ponte pass and westbound 80 to the maze 48 minutes. >> frances thanks a lot. advantage topical solution treats dogs... ( barking ) but destroys fleas. so ask your veterinarian for advantage, the flea specialist for gentle but effective, flea control.
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>> welcome back. we'll start with our temperatures. 46 in los gatos, the rest of us in the 50s with peeks of sunshine. sunshine in our valley by noon. pretty cloudy at the coast with upper 50s to low 60s from the
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coast into downtown san francisco. upper 60s, low 70s through the ♪ ♪ there she is, juju chang crossing the finish line in saturday's triathlon. she was joined by 60 friends and abc staffers completing that triathlon in connecticut this weekend. to raise $45,000 for those in need in haiti. she says she's not sore at all. this morning. >> she's superwoman. >> she is. she did a lot of good getting money for those kids in haiti. let's give juju a big hand. >> that is so fantastic. what an accomplishment, what a feat. >> a major accomplishment for juju and a lot of colleagues here at abc. good morning, america, i'm george stephanopoulos. tory johnson is back with
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five success stories. these are five people who made it big time by working in direct sales. she shows us how you can do it, too. we were talking earlier it's the re-emergence of avon. and how a promise to her dying sister launched a mission to cure breast cancer. she has a personal story in a very personal book coming up. but first, sam you have something special, too. >> we do. we've been telling everybody how pepsi is awarding millions of dollars in grants each year. this month, they're doing this. everybody getting a grant there is making a positive impact in their communities. we want to introduce you to another recipient. who will provide a unique opportunity for some extraordinary young folks. for 12 years now, talented string musicians and pianists have come together for a very special experience for the credo music camp. now held at ohio's famed oberlin
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conservatory of music, 80 young people spent three weeks of intense study with world class instructors. they also give one week of community service helping at food banks, cleaning up, performing at nursing homes, prisons, or youth centers. the $25,000 grant from pepsi will provide full scholarships to eight students for next summer's session. and if you agree with us and think there's not enough of this great stuff going on, you can vote for pepsi refresh grants. you can choose who is getting some of this money. logon to the website abcnews.com/refresh. and you can make a big difference for communities and help folks get to do some great stuff like that. and now storms coming out of the northeast, but it's going to come slow to get there. places like boston, some showers could pop up. gray and cloudy for most of the day. but the numbers go down into the 70s.
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it's kind of a cooler, refreshed, if will you, idea of cooler, fresh air moving into the northeast. memphis, about 89 degrees. there's still some heat on the board. >> all t >> all that weather was brought to you by amazon kindle. george? >> so what did you do this weekend? team juju ran a triathlon. >> you raised $45,000 for children in haiti through unicef by recruiting a huge team to join you. >> it's peer pressure.
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it helped me. i got to exercise with my friends. the motivation of being able to help kids in haiti was huge. >> what did you do? >> a quarter-mile swim, a 12-mile bike fold by a three-mile run. >> what was the toughest part? >> for me, the run. >> let's take a look. >> we arrived in the early hours. team juju, 60 members strong. there were nerveds. >> i'm scared. i'm about to puke. >> i'm taking this spot. i don't know where i'll put my bike. >> reporter: once it was time to suit up -- i feel like i finally have a number and that it's real. nerved turned to excitement. i can do this.
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i can to this thing. and standing all together, looking at the faces of my friends and colleagues, people that set this goal and challenged themselves, they're all champions just for showing up. ♪ we are the champions ♪ >> reporter: that was after the race. back up. let's do this. >> i'm going to whip her butt on national television. ♪ >> she's in the yellow hat. >> the fun part's over. >> go! >> juju. ♪ >> one done. >> have fun. >> love you. >> go team juju, whoo!
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>> go team juju! whoo-hoo! that is daddy. >> are you ready to run? great job. you're fine. >> i can hardly feel my legs. >> whoo! >> doing great. keep it going! >> go juju! >> i can smell the finish line! >> whoo. whoo! >> reporter: one by one, we did it. >> way to go, holly. >> reporter: for each of us our own personal victory. >> it's so great, i feel like crying. >> survived. >> this day would have to be a ten on the scale. >> reporter: some overcame health issues. some overcame personal fears. my coach even took third place.
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>> cash, dollars for haiti. >> reporter: i'm so proud of everyone, i'm most proud of my friend caroline, a haitian-american who overcame her fear of swimming and health issues. she finished dead last but did it all to help her home country. i feel euphoric. whatever feeling this is, they should bottle it and sell it by prescription. it's fantastic. it's physically empowering. it's emotionally powerful. it's charitable. it's good all around. >> whoo! >> that was so good. >> caroline, she's a doctor herself, she wants to go down to haiti herself and co
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and it's totally sustainable. and that's what the message is. if i can do it, anyone can do it. it's not crazy amounts of training. i snuck it in when the boys were in school. >> you're a full-time mom. >> and that's the message. it's never too late to try. logon to abcnews.com/jujugetsfit. not only to support haiti but to start a regimen yourself. >> you just committed, you're doing another triathlon? >> absolutely. next year. >> it's on tape. you're in. >> fantastic. >> congratulations. >> thanks. >> we'll be right back.
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@b as governor, he cut waste got rid
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of the mansion and the limo budgets were balanced. $4 billion in tax cuts. world class schools and universities. clean energy promoted. 1.9 million new jobs created. california was working. i'm jerry brown. california needs major changes. we have to live within our means; we have to return power and decision making to the local level-closer to the people and no new taxes without voter approval. jerry brown the knowledge and know-how to get california working again.
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ou our next guest is an example of how powerful a promise can be. 30 years ago, you wouldn't even say the words "breast cancer" on television. 30 years ago, nancy brinker's sister died of the disease. but not before nancy promised she would find a cure. nancy is the president of susan g. komen. for the cure. and she's our guest today. glad to have you here. >> thank you. >> a promise to end cancer. to find a cure for cancer. that's quite a promise you make. >> when someone you love, and you look at someone like your sister in their last moments and she asks you to do something, you do it. i thought it would take 10, 12 years. i had no idea, i promised her, if it took the rest of my life.
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it's been an amazing journey much of which i chronicled in this book. i talk about cancer, where we are, realistically where i think we can be. and the amazing journey we've had building susan g. komen for the cure. >> your sister was diagnosed in the mid-70s with breast cancer. it was a world of difference then. what was that like for her? >> she was a beautiful, young, productive, 33-year-old woman. in a community that loved her. people would cross the street when they heard she had breast cancer. because they were not words you spoke out loud. >> they thought it was contagious? >> they thought it was contagious. it broke her heart and broke my heart. she desperately wanted to stay well for her children. her children were only 6 and 10 when she died. together, we went through this journey, together with my mother, who was a saint during this period. we saw everything that needed to be fixed and that's what we tried to do at susan g. komen for the cure.
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>> you made this promise on her death bed. you started this with literally $200. and a shoe box full of contact names. >> right. i was married at the time to norman brinker, a very supportive man who taught me a lot about running and building an organization. at the same time, there were people who wanted to be a part of this. they wanted to make a difference. they knew breast cancer was happening to way too many people. even today, every 69 seconds, a woman dies of breast cancer somewhere in the world. >> that $200 has turned into $1.5 billion raised for breast cancer research since 1982. your organization is the largest source of nonprofit funds for breast cancer research. that's quite an accomplishment. >> thank you. we're leading people into the next generation. funding and really making real targeted therapies. so we can see people live longer and longer with the disease. it's already happening. >> how close are we to a cure? >> some of the things that have been funded.
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hormone estrogen-dependent cancers. early survival was 74%. and today in the united states and industrialized countries it's 98%. we're making progress. it's not overnight. we're hoping by the end of the decade, we will see this turn into a chronic, manageable disease. >> you, yourself, were diagnosed with breast cancer. given what you watched your sister go through, that must have been a terrifying diagnosis. >> it was. it was three years after she died. we actually had the same kind of tumors. i assumed i wouldn't live. to fulfill the promise. my life was spared. i had aggressive therapy early. i was able to understand what far we've come, not just in terms of cures and treatments -- almost cures and treatments, but in the
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way we deal with this disease as a society. going from crossing the street to get away from someone who had it to embracing our women friends and family? >> you know, the heartbeat and the heart and soul of susan g. komen -- we have 25 affiliates throughout the united states, and these grassroots individuals are making a difference in their communities, in their states, in their countries in global advocacy around the world. i am thrilled with the awareness part. and yet, we have to keep it going. a lot of people say there's too much pink. no, there's not. not until we have progress. >> you have transformed the color of pink for the entire nation. you bring your sister to life. it's a lovely, very moving read. on behalf of everybody touched by breast cancer, thank you u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u
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u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u
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u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u ticke tickets go on sale now for one of the most exciting projects in broadway history,
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for all of you who missed this on friday when the president spoke, we have a sneak peek. first, we shared a few words from the men who wrote it, bono and the edge. >> this is like the old man giving the keys to the new convertible to the young kid. and knowing he's probably going to drive it a lot faster than i would. but hoping he gets home safe. it's quite a moment. >> it is. it's a big moment. this is the debut performance from "spider-man: turn off the dark." this is boy falls from the sky. ♪ it can change your mind but you cannot change your heart ♪ ♪ it's a compass and a map the
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key to the jar ♪ ♪ i've been myself if i knew how to become you can fly too high and get too close to the sun ♪ ♪ see how the boy falls from the sky ♪ ♪ it's not every wanderer that's lost or far from home ♪ ♪ i didn't have to run so far to find myself alone ♪
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♪ save to save yourself can't even get that right ♪ ♪ i used to use the single breath to cross the sky ♪ ♪ and now the eye of the needle is so far tonight ♪ ♪ the boy falls from the sky ♪ ♪ ♪ oh ♪ ♪ oh ♪
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♪ oh a symphony a melody a single smile of dignity and the guard of humanity ♪ ♪ the tears are falling inside your head it's with you now there's no one else ♪ ♪ you know they got what row do believe in me believe in you ♪ ♪ you do too much you set the siege and when you're done when you're done ♪
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♪ oh oh oh oh ♪ ♪
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yt>ñ>ñ>ñ>ñ>ñ>ñ>ñ>ñ÷xú!ú!ú!ú!ú!ú!ú!ú!ú!ú!ú!ú!ú!úoúoúoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqoqo ÷ ÷ man: we need a sofa.
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something i can stretch out on! woman: ooh... that will go with those lamps my mother gave us. or we could get some new lamps. or we could get no sofa. negotiating, eh? you got it! how about a nice home for our tv? how about doors to hide that drive-in theater? how about a cowhide rug? yee-haw! and the snacks? get their own place. let the marathon begin! i know. i know i need to quit this. - well, how about... - that smokers' helpline? yeah, they can give me a plan. - help me through the rough spots. - so you're ready to... quit? everyone wants me to quit-- my doctor, my wife the dog. - not good for the dog. - anyone else? hmm? what? anyone else want you to quit? me! i want me to quit. tdd# 800-933-4833 - ( rings ) - woman: smokers' helpline. oh, hi, it's me.
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juju juju, you have a big thank you. >> i do, tom holland, my trainer, i couldn't have done it without him. and lucy denzinger. and my colleague kelly harris who pulled everyone together. >> you did a great job. >> dairy queen tomorrow. >> oh, i'll be in on that.
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as governor, he cut waste got rid of the mansion and the limo budgets were balanced. $4 billion in tax cuts. world class schools and universities. clean energy promoted. 1.9 million new jobs created. california was working. i'm jerry brown. california needs major changes. we have to live within our means; we have to return power and decision making to the local level-closer to the people and no new taxes without voter approval. jerry brown the knowledge and know-how to get california working again.
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investigators still don't know what caused the gas line to explode and burn through a san bruno neighborhood last thursday. pg&e says it's looking into one witness account of a worker checking for gas leaks in the area two days before. the company says it received no reports of gas leaks in that area during the week leading up to the fire.
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pg&e says the pipe that ruptured was a high consequence area requiring more stringent inspections. it was stalled in 1956 and last checked for leaks in march. no leaks were found at that time. let's check with mike and see where the temperatures go. >> down a little more like they did yesterday. good morning. slight arrival delays into sfo because of the cloud cover. clear by noon with east bay valleys mid to upper 70s. take till 2:00 to clear the bay with upper 60s and low 70s, pockets of sunshine at the coast. seven-day forecast, a little warming trend through thursday and cooler with a chance of rain in the north bay saturday and sunday. frances. >> mike not bad at the bay bridge toll plaza. only towards west grand that's where the slowunder begins towards the metering lights but it is slow along the peninsula, especially southbound 101 because of an earlier accident palo alto. 280 might be a better option there. a lot of slowing all around the bay area, including the east shore freeway.